Posts tagged with 'lissajous'

Lissajous Looping

  • Posted on July 15, 2013 at 12:40 am

Following on from my previous post, I thought it’d be interesting to make an animated render of the Lissajous figure. If you have an APNG-capable browser (e.g. Firefox) you can see the result on DeviantArt.

While it’s neat to be able to print static versions of these Lissajous figures, in the future I’m sure it’ll be possible to make the fully moving version as well. Now that would be really something!

Static version of the render - click for the animated version

Static Lissajous render - click for the animated version

Lissajous Loops

  • Posted on July 11, 2013 at 8:11 pm

Sines and Cosines have been responsible for some of the most elegant mathematical constructs. Lissajous curves are a particularly simple, yet elegant example. Put simply, a Lissajous is a parametric curve where each axis follows a sinusoidal path. By tweaking the amplitude and cycle length for each axis, a myriad of different patterns can be generated, from circles to intricately woven lattices.

The parametric curves in Functy are particularly suitable for generating nice Lissajous curves, and as usual, they can be output for 3D printing. The results of pumping them through a 3D printer, courtesy of Shapeways, can be seen in the photos below, along with a Blender Cycles render of one of the curves.

If you fancy getting really up-close-and-personal with them, you can order your own copies as unusual desk ornaments, from the Shapeways site.

3D printed Lissajous curves

3D printed Lissajous curves

3D rendered Lissajous curve

Rendered Lissajous curve

Lissajous and lava lamps

  • Posted on June 12, 2009 at 6:35 pm

Time for another demo video. This time I’ve tried to create a 2D function on a 3D surface by playing around with the colours of some function.

In the 90s I used to love watching clever computer demos. One of the visual effects that was sometimes used was that of viscous circles or spheres that would meld together when they moved close one another. This created the kind of effect you get with a lava lamp. In this demo I try to recreate this effect using a couple of functions and a computer that’s probably several thousand times more powerful than the ones the demos ran on. Does the resulting effect work? See for yourself!

I do apologise though for the terrible delivery.

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